Changes at Digg Affect Search Engine Optimization

Ordinarily, Digg and other bookmarking sites are good ways to get more links pointing to your blog or website. Google ranks your site (partly) by counting the external links that point to your blog or website. The more links that point to your site, the higher its rank, and the more likely it is to come up on the first page of search results. See for example, To Digg or Not to Digg?. This is part of “Search Engine Optimization.” SEO is about using various tactics to get Google and other search engines to put your site on the first page of search results.

By the way, Google has no way of knowing how much traffic your site actually gets. That’s why they count the number of links to your site. They use the number of links pointing to your site as a rough indicator of your site’s popularity. Google and other search engines get this link information from their web crawlers.

However, there have been some recent changes at Digg that reduce the number of links that are likely to point to your site. Under certain circumstances, links that could point to your site now point back to Digg. This increases the traffic to Digg at the expense of users and publishers. Consequently, these changes reduce the advantages of using Digg. Here are two recent reports from Mashable.com that explain the issue in detail: Digg Accused of Twitter Traffic Bait and Switch and Digg Just Highjacked Your Twitter Links

Digg, of course, continues to be a good way to get more traffic to your site. When you “digg” an article, you are recommending it to others who may then check it out. This traffic to the article still happens.

We will report on any further changes from Digg, or on any response from Digg regarding these changes.

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